Tag Archive: non-fiction

CCLaP: Milwaukee Mayhem, by Matthew J. Prigge

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This week Karl Wolff reviews “Milwaukee Mayhem,” by Matthew J. Prigge, a collection of lurid tales of the Cream City’s dark side.

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William Merritt Chase: An American Master, by Elsa Smithgall et al. @ NYJB

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The Directors’ Preface announces that “This exhibition is the first retrospective on Chase in thirty years.”

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The Eyes of the City, by Richard Sandler @ NYJB

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“The Eyes of the City invites an unhurried view, seducing the eye to linger over the images, letting stories come to life in the mind.”

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The Art of Reviewing: Critics, Monsters, Fanatics, and Other Literary Essays, by Cynthia Ozick

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Like Updike, Anthony Burgess, and Vladimir Nabokov, Cynthia Ozick writes reviews with lush prose, each essay a stimulant to those seeking the beautiful interplay of ideas, language, and strong opinions.

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Critical Appraisals: Disinheritance: Poems, by John Sibley Williams

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“Disinheritance” is John Sibley Williams’s rumination on death and grief.

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American Odd: Henry Darger: Selected Art and Writings, by Michael Bonesteel

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This week I continue my American Odd essay series with a look at Chicago-area artist and recluse Henry Darger.

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Israel: A Concise History of a Nation Reborn, by Daniel Gordis @ NYJB

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“For those interested in an introductory volume about the Jewish people and Israeli history, this book is highly recommended.”

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Morbid Curiosities: Collections of the Uncommon and the Bizarre, by Paul Gambino @ NYJB

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“Morbid Curiosities” by Paul Gambino is highly recommended for its lurid yet tasteful exploration of an otherwise ignored subculture of collecting.”

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Black Beauties: Iconic Cars Photographed by Rene Staud, by Rene Staud @ NYJB

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“Black Beauties” by Rene Staud is “[a] stylish and intelligent discussion of the intersection of transportation, aesthetics, and meaning.”

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The German War: A Nation Under Arms, 1939–1945, by Nicholas Stargardt @NYJB

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“The German War” is an important scholarly achievement in the field of modern German history, and it is written with an epic narrative sweep.

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