Category Archive: nyjb

Mean Streets: NYC 1970–1985, by Edward Grazda @ NYJB

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Taking its name from the iconic 1973 Martin Scorsese film, “Mean Streets: NYC 1970–1985,” this book by Edward Grazda captures the city in all its manic energy.

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Paradise Now, by Chris Jennings @ NYJB

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“Paradise Now” by Chris Jennings is “a book not only fascinating but necessary for these trying times.”

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Hitler Saved My Life: WARNING―This Book Makes Jokes About the Third Reich, the Reign of Terror, World War I, Cancer, Millard Fillmore, Chernobyl, and … Nude Photograph of an Unattractive Man. by Jim Riswold @ NYJB

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“This isn’t the usual tearjerker cancer story. It is a gleefully offensive cancer story. It is the Blazing Saddles of cancer stories.”

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Commotion of the Birds: New Poems by John Ashbery

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In John Ashbery’s final book of poetry “Images coagulate and dissolve in a kaleidoscope of language.”

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Translation Tuesdays: For Two Thousand Years @ NYJB

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“For Two Thousand Years” by Mihail Sebastian is a hidden gem in European literature, shining a light on what happened in Romania between the wars.

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Beautiful Berlin Boys, by Ashkan Sahihi @ NYJB

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“Beautiful Berlin Boys” by Ashkan Sahihi resounds as an affirmation of the beauty and individuality of the gay man.”

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Blog Update for October 2017

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CCLaP Links Not Working? Since 2012 I have reviewed books for the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography (CCLaP). Recently CCLaP has moved its website to a new WordPress platform. If you haven’t… Continue reading

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Lead Poisoning: The Pencil Art of Geof Darrow @ NYJB

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“Lead Poisoning” is a fantastic voyage into the head of an artistic visionary.

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David Freund: Gas Stop @ nyjb

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“David Fruend: Gas Stop” represents a monumental achievement in photojournalism.

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Langdon Clay: Cars: New York City, 1974 – 1976, by Langdon Clay @ nyjb

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The mid-seventies evoked here showcase a city in transition and the streets populated with gigantic metal slabs of American automotive expression.

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