Category Archive: nyjb

Nature Poem by Tommy Pico @ NYJB

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Part backlash, part meditation, “Nature Poem” by Tommy Pico is an urban hipster’s struggle to write on a subject he feels is “stereotypical, reductive, and boring.”

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Harry Benson: Persons of Interest, by Harry Benson @ NYJB

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The photographs are instantly recognizable, the name is not.

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Translation Tuesdays: The Absolute Gravedigger, by Vítěslav Nezval @ NYJB

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Violent, erotic, dreamlike, and weird

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Fools, Frauds and Firebrands: Thinkers of the New Left, by Roger Scruton @ NYJB

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“Fools, Frauds and Firebrands: Thinkers of the New Left” is a no-holds-barred take-down of the modern Left.

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Translation Tuesdays: Vaseline Buddha, by Jung Young Moon @ NYJB

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“Vaseline Buddha” is a brilliant example of contemporary South Korean literature.

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The Familiar, Volume 5: Redwood, by Mark Z. Danielewski @ NYJB

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If William Gibson, Michael Connelly, and Neil Gaiman wrote a series, it might end up looking like The Familiar.

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The Familiar, Volume 4: Hades, by Mark Z. Danielewski @ NYJB

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“The Familiar” series weaves a series of interrelated narratives together. It combines different genres and styles, ranging from hard-boiled Los Angeles noir to stream-of-consciousness psychological introspection. It is referential and self-referential with typographic experimentation and excesses. At times the traditional arrangement of paragraphs shatter, explode, or blur. In other instances the words form pictures, the boundaries between word and image disappearing altogether.

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Jongwoo Park: DMZ, by Jongwoo Park @ NYJB

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The DMZ between North and South Korea has never been photographed, either by civilians or the military … until now.

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Mean Streets: NYC 1970–1985, by Edward Grazda @ NYJB

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Taking its name from the iconic 1973 Martin Scorsese film, “Mean Streets: NYC 1970–1985,” this book by Edward Grazda captures the city in all its manic energy.

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Paradise Now, by Chris Jennings @ NYJB

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“Paradise Now” by Chris Jennings is “a book not only fascinating but necessary for these trying times.”

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