Category Archive: books

CCLaP Fridays: The Full Catastrophe: Travels Among the New Greek Ruins, by James Angelos

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Is Greece the bastion of democracy, philosophy, and the West? Or is it a backward and corrupt regime dominated by inefficient bureaucrats, political extremists, and greedy opportunists? The answer is Yes.

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Gerhard Richter: Panorama: A Retrospective: Expanded Edition, by Mark Godfrey @ NYJB

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“Gerhard Richter: Panorama” offers a means to delve into the artistic practice of an iconic figure in modern European art.

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Last Look by Charles Burns @ NYJB

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“Last Look” is a cold indictment of pretentious frauds yet an intimate exploration of fear, regret, and failure.

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Scriptorium: Poems, by Melissa Range @ NYJB

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“Scriptorium” is a rare and beautiful collection of poetry.

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William Merritt Chase: An American Master, by Elsa Smithgall et al. @ NYJB

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The Directors’ Preface announces that “This exhibition is the first retrospective on Chase in thirty years.”

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The Eyes of the City, by Richard Sandler @ NYJB

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“The Eyes of the City invites an unhurried view, seducing the eye to linger over the images, letting stories come to life in the mind.”

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The Art of Reviewing: Critics, Monsters, Fanatics, and Other Literary Essays, by Cynthia Ozick

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Like Updike, Anthony Burgess, and Vladimir Nabokov, Cynthia Ozick writes reviews with lush prose, each essay a stimulant to those seeking the beautiful interplay of ideas, language, and strong opinions.

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Critical Appraisals: Disinheritance: Poems, by John Sibley Williams

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“Disinheritance” is John Sibley Williams’s rumination on death and grief.

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American Odd: Henry Darger: Selected Art and Writings, by Michael Bonesteel

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This week I continue my American Odd essay series with a look at Chicago-area artist and recluse Henry Darger.

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IRL by Tommy Pico @NYJB

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Whipsawing between passages of erotic ecstasy and suicidal despair, “IRL” by Tommy “Teebs” Pico reveals itself as a monument of self-lacerating beauty.

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