Category Archive: postmodernism

Hitler Saved My Life: WARNING―This Book Makes Jokes About the Third Reich, the Reign of Terror, World War I, Cancer, Millard Fillmore, Chernobyl, and … Nude Photograph of an Unattractive Man. by Jim Riswold @ NYJB

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“This isn’t the usual tearjerker cancer story. It is a gleefully offensive cancer story. It is the Blazing Saddles of cancer stories.”

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Commotion of the Birds: New Poems by John Ashbery

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In John Ashbery’s final book of poetry “Images coagulate and dissolve in a kaleidoscope of language.”

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CCLaP Fridays: Legion on FX

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“Legion” is the best show on TV.

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American Odd: Pack of Lies, by Gilbert Sorrentino

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This week I conclude my essay series American Odd by looking at Gilbert Sorrentino’s postmodern masterpiece “Pack of Lies.”

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Buck Studies by Douglas Kearney @ NYJB

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“Buck Studies” is “a potent cocktail of political anger and radical formal experimentation.”

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Gerhard Richter: Panorama: A Retrospective: Expanded Edition, by Mark Godfrey @ NYJB

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“Gerhard Richter: Panorama” offers a means to delve into the artistic practice of an iconic figure in modern European art.

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Last Look by Charles Burns @ NYJB

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“Last Look” is a cold indictment of pretentious frauds yet an intimate exploration of fear, regret, and failure.

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The Familiar, Volume 2: Into the Forest, by Mark Z. Danielewski @NYJB

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The saga of Xanther and her cat continue in “The Familiar, Volume 2: Into the Woods,” by Mark Z. Danielewski. But questions arise when her father Anwar takes them to the vet. The vet tells Xanther that her puff of white fur isn’t a cat at all, but a dog. It isn’t just born, but very old. It also belongs to someone else.

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Translation Tuesdays: One Hundred Twenty-One Days by Michele Audin

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Michèle Audin’s debut novel “One Hundred Twenty-One Days” is a story about mathematics and love.

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CCLaP Fridays: The Subversive Utopia, by Yasir Sakr

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This week I review a specialist text on the interconnection between architecture, urban planning, religion, and politics.

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