Category Archive: France

The Attraction of Things, by Roger Lewinter @NYJB

by

“Roger Lewinter casts an exacting eye upon himself, creating in prose a self-portrait worthy of Rembrandt.”

Rate this:

Translation Tuesdays: Story of Love in Solitude, by Roger Lewinter

by

“[Lewinter’s] unique literary voice . . . is that of an obsessive, a philosopher, and a miniaturist.”

Rate this:

Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster 1887–2058, by Emma Lavigne @NYJB

by

“The past and the future are her playground, and she relays an open invitation to all who seek a daring museum experience.”

Rate this:

Translation Tuesdays: Abahn Sabana David, by Marguerite Duras @ NYJB

by

“Abahn Sabana David” by Marguerite Duras is “a fable about ideological extremism under an avant-garde skin.”

Rate this:

The German War: A Nation Under Arms, 1939–1945, by Nicholas Stargardt @NYJB

by

“The German War” is an important scholarly achievement in the field of modern German history, and it is written with an epic narrative sweep.

Rate this:

After Hitler: The Last Ten Days of World War II in Europe, by Michael Jones @ NYJB

by

“After Hitler” by Michael Jones is “a brilliant exploration of the final days of the European theater, valuable in its military analysis and generous use of eyewitness accounts.”

Rate this:

Translation Tuesdays: The Curious Case of Dassoukine’s Trousers, by Fouad Laroui @ NYJB

by

Fouad Laroui casts his eye on Morocco’s dour political legacy with the scalpel-like precision of a social satirist.

Rate this:

Translation Tuesdays: In the Cafe of Lost Youth, by Patrick Modiano @ NYJB

by

Patrick Modiano goes beyond the checklist accuracies of historical fiction, fashioning a lush fever dream filled with glamor, mystery, and despair.

Rate this:

Translation Tuesdays: One Hundred Twenty-One Days by Michele Audin

by

Michèle Audin’s debut novel “One Hundred Twenty-One Days” is a story about mathematics and love.

Rate this:

Forgotten Classics: Life in the Folds, by Henri Michaux @ NYJB

by

Life in the Folds by Henri Michaux is “a masterpiece of concision and pain. . . . a literary achievement . . .”

Rate this: