Tag Archive: Modernism

American Odd: Pack of Lies, by Gilbert Sorrentino

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This week I conclude my essay series American Odd by looking at Gilbert Sorrentino’s postmodern masterpiece “Pack of Lies.”

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Buck Studies by Douglas Kearney @ NYJB

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“Buck Studies” is “a potent cocktail of political anger and radical formal experimentation.”

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Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster 1887–2058, by Emma Lavigne @NYJB

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“The past and the future are her playground, and she relays an open invitation to all who seek a daring museum experience.”

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Gerhard Richter: Panorama: A Retrospective: Expanded Edition, by Mark Godfrey @ NYJB

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“Gerhard Richter: Panorama” offers a means to delve into the artistic practice of an iconic figure in modern European art.

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William Merritt Chase: An American Master, by Elsa Smithgall et al. @ NYJB

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The Directors’ Preface announces that “This exhibition is the first retrospective on Chase in thirty years.”

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Translation Tuesdays: One Hundred Twenty-One Days by Michele Audin

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Michèle Audin’s debut novel “One Hundred Twenty-One Days” is a story about mathematics and love.

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Forgotten Classics: Life in the Folds, by Henri Michaux @ NYJB

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Life in the Folds by Henri Michaux is “a masterpiece of concision and pain. . . . a literary achievement . . .”

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Twenty-One Days of a Neurasthenic, by Octave Mirbeau @ NYJB

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What’s the best cure for a man who hates the mountains? Send him to the mountains. What’s the best cure for a misanthrope? Send him to live with other people. Thus begins “Twenty-One Days of a Neurasthenic” by Octave Mirbeau (1848–1917).

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Undoing Time: The Life and Work of Samuel Beckett, by Jennifer Birkett @ NYJB

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For Jennifer Birkett, Emeritus Professor of French Studies at the University of Birmingham, Samuel Beckett thought “life was a matter of doing time, while writing was a way of undoing it.”

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Commonplace Book: April is the cruelest month …

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I. Burial of the Dead April is the cruelest month, breeding Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing Memory and desire, stirring Dull roots with spring rain. Winter kept us warm, covering Earth… Continue reading

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