Tag Archive: Modernism

Commotion of the Birds: New Poems by John Ashbery

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In John Ashbery’s final book of poetry “Images coagulate and dissolve in a kaleidoscope of language.”

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American Odd: Pack of Lies, by Gilbert Sorrentino

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This week I conclude my essay series American Odd by looking at Gilbert Sorrentino’s postmodern masterpiece “Pack of Lies.”

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Buck Studies by Douglas Kearney @ NYJB

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“Buck Studies” is “a potent cocktail of political anger and radical formal experimentation.”

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Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster 1887–2058, by Emma Lavigne @NYJB

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“The past and the future are her playground, and she relays an open invitation to all who seek a daring museum experience.”

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Gerhard Richter: Panorama: A Retrospective: Expanded Edition, by Mark Godfrey @ NYJB

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“Gerhard Richter: Panorama” offers a means to delve into the artistic practice of an iconic figure in modern European art.

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William Merritt Chase: An American Master, by Elsa Smithgall et al. @ NYJB

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The Directors’ Preface announces that “This exhibition is the first retrospective on Chase in thirty years.”

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Translation Tuesdays: One Hundred Twenty-One Days by Michele Audin

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Michèle Audin’s debut novel “One Hundred Twenty-One Days” is a story about mathematics and love.

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Forgotten Classics: Life in the Folds, by Henri Michaux @ NYJB

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Life in the Folds by Henri Michaux is “a masterpiece of concision and pain. . . . a literary achievement . . .”

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Twenty-One Days of a Neurasthenic, by Octave Mirbeau @ NYJB

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What’s the best cure for a man who hates the mountains? Send him to the mountains. What’s the best cure for a misanthrope? Send him to live with other people. Thus begins “Twenty-One Days of a Neurasthenic” by Octave Mirbeau (1848–1917).

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Undoing Time: The Life and Work of Samuel Beckett, by Jennifer Birkett @ NYJB

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For Jennifer Birkett, Emeritus Professor of French Studies at the University of Birmingham, Samuel Beckett thought “life was a matter of doing time, while writing was a way of undoing it.”

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