Tag Archive: fascism

Fools, Frauds and Firebrands: Thinkers of the New Left, by Roger Scruton @ NYJB

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“Fools, Frauds and Firebrands: Thinkers of the New Left” is a no-holds-barred take-down of the modern Left.

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Hitler Saved My Life: WARNING―This Book Makes Jokes About the Third Reich, the Reign of Terror, World War I, Cancer, Millard Fillmore, Chernobyl, and … Nude Photograph of an Unattractive Man. by Jim Riswold @ NYJB

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“This isn’t the usual tearjerker cancer story. It is a gleefully offensive cancer story. It is the Blazing Saddles of cancer stories.”

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Translation Tuesdays: For Two Thousand Years @ NYJB

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“For Two Thousand Years” by Mihail Sebastian is a hidden gem in European literature, shining a light on what happened in Romania between the wars.

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The Art of Reviewing: Critics, Monsters, Fanatics, and Other Literary Essays, by Cynthia Ozick

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Like Updike, Anthony Burgess, and Vladimir Nabokov, Cynthia Ozick writes reviews with lush prose, each essay a stimulant to those seeking the beautiful interplay of ideas, language, and strong opinions.

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The German War: A Nation Under Arms, 1939–1945, by Nicholas Stargardt @NYJB

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“The German War” is an important scholarly achievement in the field of modern German history, and it is written with an epic narrative sweep.

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Ezra Pound: Poet: Volume III: The Tragic Years 1939–1972, by A. David Moody @ NYJB

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“Ezra Pound: Poet: Volume III: The Tragic Years 1939–1972,” by A. David Moody chronicles Pound’s life from his Italian residency prior to the outbreak of World War II to his death.

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The Devil’s Chessboard: Allen Dulles, the CIA, and the Rise of America’s Secret Government, by David Talbot @ NYJB

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“The Devil’s Chessboard: Allen Dulles, the CIA, and the Rise of America’s Secret Government” by David Talbot is a book chronicling the collision of two powerful dynasties, the Dulles family and the Kennedy family.

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Translation Tuesdays: Wonder (1962), by Hugo Claus

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Wonder is a strange book. By turns sarcastic, hallucinatory, satirical, and dreamlike, it relates the misadventures of one Victor-Denijs de Rijckel, a teacher who pursues a mysterious woman only to find himself posing as an expert of Crabbe, a messianic figure associated with Nazi collaboration.

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The Cantos by Ezra Pound, A Critical Appraisal

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I: The Mount Everest of Modernism “It is not the mountain we conquer, but ourselves.” – Sir Edmund Hillary The Cantos.  Ezra Pound.  The very mention of those names send shudders down even… Continue reading

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