Tag Archive: architecture

Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster 1887–2058, by Emma Lavigne @NYJB

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“The past and the future are her playground, and she relays an open invitation to all who seek a daring museum experience.”

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CCLaP Fridays: The Subversive Utopia, by Yasir Sakr

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This week I review a specialist text on the interconnection between architecture, urban planning, religion, and politics.

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2 books on Germany @ NYJB

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I review books on Hitler’s domestic spaces and how Germany deals with 4 centuries of history over at the New York Journal of Books.

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The Megapolitan Flâneur: Greater Downtown Milwaukee: Milwaukee Food Tours: Explore Milwaukee Hop On / Hop Off Sightseeing Bus

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Whether you are a tourist visiting Cream City or a lifelong resident, check out The Sightseeing Bus from Milwaukee Food Tours. It is a solid hour of education and entertainment.

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CCLaP Fridays: Red Fortress: History and Illusion in the Kremlin, by Catherine Merridale

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This week at CCLaP, I review Red Fortress: History and Illusion in the Kremlin, by Catherine Merridale, about the history of Moscow’s most iconic structure.

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CCLaP Fridays: The Early Parking Garages of San Francisco, by Mark D. Kessler

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This week at CCLaP Karl Wolff reviews, “The Early Parking Garages of San Francisco,” by Mark D. Kessler, an obscure topic that may reward a specialized type of reader.

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CCCP@CCLaP

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Today at CCLaP, I review Taschen’s acclaimed Cosmic Communist Constructions Photographed by Frederic Chaubin. The book explores Soviet architecture from the late ’60s to the early ’90s, showing an uncharacteristic exuberance and ethnic… Continue reading

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Critic’s Notebook: A Demanding Read, Part II (Non-fiction)

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The act of reading can exact a demanding price from the reader.  If one lacks preparation, he or she can be left in a wallow of ignorance.  Certain titles exist that a reader… Continue reading

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Brideshead Revisited: The Sacred and Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder (1945) by Evelyn Waugh

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In Samuel Beckett’s play, Waiting for Godot, Pozzo remarks, “They give birth astride of a grave, the light gleams an instant, then it’s night once more.”  Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh represents one… Continue reading

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