Tag Archive: law

More NSFW Files: Sin-a-Rama: Expanded Edition: Sleaze Sex Paperbacks of the Sixties, edited by Adam Parfey and B. Astrid Daley

by

Originally published in 2005, Feral House has reissued “Sin-a-Rama: Sleaze Sex Paperbacks of the Sixties” in a new, expanded edition. Edited by Adam Parfrey and B. Astrid Daley, Sin-a-Rama delves into this lesser known literary genre.

Rate this:

CCLaP Fridays: Speak Now: Marriage Equality on Trial, by Kenji Yoshino

by

This week I review “Speak Now: Marriage Equality on Trial,” by Kenji Yoshino, about the court case that eventually repealed Prop 8.

Rate this:

Mondays with the Supremes/CCLaP Fridays Crossover: Uncertain Justice: The Roberts Court and the Constitution, by Laurence Tribe and Joshua Matz

by

his week I review Uncertain Justice: The Roberts Court and the Constitution, by Laurence Tribe and Joshua Matz, a sober look at the Roberts Court and how recent rulings have shaped modern law.

Rate this:

The Familiar, Volume 1: One Rainy Day in May, by Mark I. Danielewski @ NYJB

by

“Understanding the full scope of The Familiar is akin to counting the raindrops.”

Rate this:

Commonplace Book: Karl Kraus and Charlie Hebdo

by

“Many people want to strike me dead. Others want to spend time chatting with me. The law protects me from the first group.” — Karl Kraus

Rate this:

Mondays with the Supremes: The Death Penalty

by

In this installment of Mondays with the Supremes, I investigate two books that discuss the death penalty and its implications. Comments encouraged.

Rate this:

CCLaP Fridays: The Passage of Power, by Robert Caro

by

This week I review “The Passage of Power,” Robert Caro’s 4th volume in his epic biography of Lyndon Johnson.

Rate this:

MONDAYS WITH THE SUPREMES: PART V: SUPREME COURT SWINGERS

by

A limited-run series where I review three books about the Supreme Court of the United States, exploring its historical and ideological conflicts, and the transformations it wrought upon law and society. This week, I examine the Justices who hold the “swing vote.”

Rate this:

MONDAYS WITH THE SUPREMES, PART III: KOREMATSU, BROWN, AND PADILLA

by

A limited-run series where I review three books about the Supreme Court of the United States, exploring its historical and ideological conflicts, and the transformations it wrought upon law and society. This week: Three Supreme Court cases that examine “binding precedent”, race, and national security.

Rate this:

Mondays with the Supremes: Part I: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court

by

I begin a limited-run series where I review three books about the Supreme Court of the United States, exploring its historical and ideological conflicts, and the transformations it wrought upon law and society.

Rate this: