Gerhard Richter: Panorama: A Retrospective: Expanded Edition, by Mark Godfrey @ NYJB

“Gerhard Richter: Panorama” offers a means to delve into the artistic practice of an iconic figure in modern European art. Continue reading Gerhard Richter: Panorama: A Retrospective: Expanded Edition, by Mark Godfrey @ NYJB

Rate this:

The Art of Reviewing: Critics, Monsters, Fanatics, and Other Literary Essays, by Cynthia Ozick

Like Updike, Anthony Burgess, and Vladimir Nabokov, Cynthia Ozick writes reviews with lush prose, each essay a stimulant to those seeking the beautiful interplay of ideas, language, and strong opinions. Continue reading The Art of Reviewing: Critics, Monsters, Fanatics, and Other Literary Essays, by Cynthia Ozick

Rate this:

Translation Tuesdays: The Fox Was Ever the Hunter, by Herta Muller @NYJB

Ms. Müller won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2009. The Swedish Academy awarded it because her writing is imbued “with the concentration of poetry and the frankness of prose, depicts the landscape of the dispossessed.” Despite the spies, surveillance, and tyranny, the Romania she presents appears like a fairy tale. Continue reading Translation Tuesdays: The Fox Was Ever the Hunter, by Herta Muller @NYJB

Rate this:

Ezra Pound: Poet: Volume III: The Tragic Years 1939–1972, by A. David Moody @ NYJB

“Ezra Pound: Poet: Volume III: The Tragic Years 1939–1972,” by A. David Moody chronicles Pound’s life from his Italian residency prior to the outbreak of World War II to his death. Continue reading Ezra Pound: Poet: Volume III: The Tragic Years 1939–1972, by A. David Moody @ NYJB

Rate this:

The Familiar, Volume 2: Into the Forest, by Mark Z. Danielewski @NYJB

The saga of Xanther and her cat continue in “The Familiar, Volume 2: Into the Woods,” by Mark Z. Danielewski. But questions arise when her father Anwar takes them to the vet. The vet tells Xanther that her puff of white fur isn’t a cat at all, but a dog. It isn’t just born, but very old. It also belongs to someone else. Continue reading The Familiar, Volume 2: Into the Forest, by Mark Z. Danielewski @NYJB

Rate this: