After Hitler: The Last Ten Days of World War II in Europe, by Michael Jones @ NYJB

“After Hitler” by Michael Jones is “a brilliant exploration of the final days of the European theater, valuable in its military analysis and generous use of eyewitness accounts.” Continue reading After Hitler: The Last Ten Days of World War II in Europe, by Michael Jones @ NYJB

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CCLaP Fridays: God and the Fascists, by Karlheinz Deschner

This week at CCLaP I review a controversial book, God and the Fascists, by Karlheinz Deschner, that implicates Vatican culpability with several fascist leaders. Continue reading CCLaP Fridays: God and the Fascists, by Karlheinz Deschner

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CCLaP Fridays: On Being Human: Hellboy, by Mike Mignola

In this week’s installment of Karl Wolff’s essay series, “On Being Human,” he explores the comic book series “Hellboy,” and a how a cigar-chomping hell demon, who also happens to be a practicing Catholic, works to save the world for Rasputin, Nazis, and all manner of Lovecraftian nightmarish entities. Continue reading CCLaP Fridays: On Being Human: Hellboy, by Mike Mignola

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CCLaP Fridays: The Duke Don’t Dance, by Richard Sharp

This week, Karl Wolff reviews Richard Sharp’s novel “The Duke Don’t Dance,” tracing several friends across decades and continents from the jungles of Southeast Asia to a DC lobbying firm and beyond. The novel combines nuanced literary observations with cutting satire. Continue reading CCLaP Fridays: The Duke Don’t Dance, by Richard Sharp

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MONDAYS WITH THE SUPREMES, PART III: KOREMATSU, BROWN, AND PADILLA

A limited-run series where I review three books about the Supreme Court of the United States, exploring its historical and ideological conflicts, and the transformations it wrought upon law and society. This week: Three Supreme Court cases that examine “binding precedent”, race, and national security. Continue reading MONDAYS WITH THE SUPREMES, PART III: KOREMATSU, BROWN, AND PADILLA

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Translation Tuesdays: Wonder (1962), by Hugo Claus

Wonder is a strange book. By turns sarcastic, hallucinatory, satirical, and dreamlike, it relates the misadventures of one Victor-Denijs de Rijckel, a teacher who pursues a mysterious woman only to find himself posing as an expert of Crabbe, a messianic figure associated with Nazi collaboration. Continue reading Translation Tuesdays: Wonder (1962), by Hugo Claus

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