CCLaP Fridays: Pontiac Concept and Show Cars, by Don Keefe

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This week I review Don Keefe’s “Pontiac Concept and Show Cars.” Gearheads and Midcentury Modern enthusiasts should check this out.

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Translation Tuesdays: Houses, by Borislav Pekic @NYJB

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“Houses” by Borislav Pekic offers a fascinating window into literature of the other Europe

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The Pocket Square, by A.C. Phillips @NYJB

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The “Pocket Square” is a useful guide for anyone who wears a suit, biological determinism be damned.

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An Interview with Nicole Cushing

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Earlier this month over at the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography, I reviewed “Mr. Suicide,” by Nicole Cushing. As my review went online, I found out Cushing’s book won the Bram Stoker Award for Best Debut Horror Novel. In this interview, Nicole and I discuss cons, “likeable characters,” Louisville, Kentucky, and the definition of evil.

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An Interview with Michael Sean LeSueur

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Last February, I reviewed “Pixiegate Madoke” by Michael Sean LeSueur at the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography (CCLaP). I had an email interview with Michael, where we discussed gender politics, bizarro literature, and pop culture.

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CCLaP Fridays: Nuns with Guns, by Seth Kaufman

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“Nuns with Guns” by Seth Kaufman is a dark satire about 4 nuns, a reality show producer, and a televised gun exchange program. Hilarity ensues.

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CCLaP Fridays: Mr. Suicide by Nicole Cushing

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“Mr. Suicide” by Nicole Cushing is a dark novel of dysfunction, abuse, and violence.

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Translation Tuesdays: One Hundred Twenty-One Days by Michele Audin

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Michèle Audin’s debut novel “One Hundred Twenty-One Days” is a story about mathematics and love.

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CCLaP Fridays: The Subversive Utopia, by Yasir Sakr

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This week I review a specialist text on the interconnection between architecture, urban planning, religion, and politics.

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Forgotten Classics: Life in the Folds, by Henri Michaux @ NYJB

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Life in the Folds by Henri Michaux is “a masterpiece of concision and pain. . . . a literary achievement . . .”

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