The Familiar, Volume 2: Into the Forest, by Mark Z. Danielewski @NYJB

The saga of Xanther and her cat continue in “The Familiar, Volume 2: Into the Woods,” by Mark Z. Danielewski. But questions arise when her father Anwar takes them to the vet. The vet tells Xanther that her puff of white fur isn’t a cat at all, but a dog. It isn’t just born, but very old. It also belongs to someone else. Continue reading The Familiar, Volume 2: Into the Forest, by Mark Z. Danielewski @NYJB

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Peel Back the Skin, edited by Anthony Rivera and Sharon Lawson @NYJB

Is there poetry after Auschwitz? Is there horror after the massacre in Orlando? “Peel Back the Skin: Anthology of Horror Stories,” edited by Anthony Rivera and Sharon Lawson, reveals why horror is necessary today. Continue reading Peel Back the Skin, edited by Anthony Rivera and Sharon Lawson @NYJB

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An Interview with Nicole Cushing

Earlier this month over at the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography, I reviewed “Mr. Suicide,” by Nicole Cushing. As my review went online, I found out Cushing’s book won the Bram Stoker Award for Best Debut Horror Novel. In this interview, Nicole and I discuss cons, “likeable characters,” Louisville, Kentucky, and the definition of evil. Continue reading An Interview with Nicole Cushing

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On Being Human Redux: Frankenstein Underground, by Mike Mignola and Ben Stenbeck

When I wrote “On Being Human,” I wrote an essay on Mike Mignola’s “Hellboy.” “Frankenstein Underground” expands on Mignola’s pulpy universe, giving us a fun graphic novel about Frankenstein’s monster. Continue reading On Being Human Redux: Frankenstein Underground, by Mike Mignola and Ben Stenbeck

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Reservoir Gods by Brian Knight @ Joe Bob Briggs

Dworshak was a body of water created by the Clearwater River. The dammed river created this reservoir that powers the town of Orofino. This project flooded a previously abandoned town and there are tales of desecrated Indian burial grounds. Amidst this stew of history, legend, and hearsay, Brian Knight brings us a “Big Fish Tale.” Remember the one that got away? Reservoir Gods is one of those stories. The story centers around the lives of various individuals spending their time around Dworshak. There is Commissioner Grant Lang, who enjoys the outdoors, camping with his underlings, and the occasional fourteen-year-old girl. … Continue reading Reservoir Gods by Brian Knight @ Joe Bob Briggs

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