Translation Tuesdays: Austerity Measures: The New Greek Poetry, edited by Karen Van Dyck @ nyjb

Bad economics makes for good poetry. Continue reading Translation Tuesdays: Austerity Measures: The New Greek Poetry, edited by Karen Van Dyck @ nyjb

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CCLaP Fridays: The Full Catastrophe: Travels Among the New Greek Ruins, by James Angelos

Is Greece the bastion of democracy, philosophy, and the West? Or is it a backward and corrupt regime dominated by inefficient bureaucrats, political extremists, and greedy opportunists? The answer is Yes. Continue reading CCLaP Fridays: The Full Catastrophe: Travels Among the New Greek Ruins, by James Angelos

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Translation Tuesdays: The Iliad: A New Translation by Caroline Alexander @ NYJB

After ten years of war, soldiers have grown weary. The leadership now endures uncouth criticism of its policy, accusations of self-interest and self-aggrandizement become commonplace. The gods remain fickle, taking sides and influencing the ground game. Some things never change. Continue reading Translation Tuesdays: The Iliad: A New Translation by Caroline Alexander @ NYJB

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Forgotten Classics: The Dark Labyrinth (1947) by Lawrence Durrell

  An infrequent feature on classic books forgotten to the mists of time. The name Lawrence Durrell is not a name mentioned with any frequency these days, but his work deserves a revival.  The Dark Labyrinth, published in 1947, begins with a simple enough premise: a small group of tourists visits a Cretan labyrinth.  In the ensuing narrative, the group gets lost with certain members getting rescued while others never return.  With this basic plot, Durrell spins a tale chock full of philosophical rumination, surgical precision social satire, and capacious character development.  The foredoomed tour group includes a failed artist, … Continue reading Forgotten Classics: The Dark Labyrinth (1947) by Lawrence Durrell

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