CCLaP Fridays: A Giant Cow-tipping by Savages, by John Weir Close

I celebrate Black Friday by reviewing A Giant Cow-tipping by Savages, by John Weir Close, in which Close explores the wild world of mergers and acquisitions in the coke-fueled 80s. Continue reading CCLaP Fridays: A Giant Cow-tipping by Savages, by John Weir Close

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CCLaP Fridays: Anything That Moves, by Dana Goodyear

This week at CCLaP, I review Anything That Moves: Renegade Chefs, Fearless Eaters, and the Making of a New American Food Culture, by Dana Goodyear, that encompasses everything from anti-FDA crusaders to luxury chefs in Vegas to seekers of illegal whale meat. Continue reading CCLaP Fridays: Anything That Moves, by Dana Goodyear

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The Confidence Trap, by David Runciman @ NYJB

At the New York Journal of Books I review The Confidence Trap: A History of Democracy in Crisis from World War I to the Present, by David Runciman, a challenging, confounding, but ultimately rewarding political analysis democracy’s ability to weather crises and occasionally get blindsided by the next crisis. Continue reading The Confidence Trap, by David Runciman @ NYJB

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Empire of Secrets: British Intelligence, the Cold War, and the Twilight of Empire, by Calder Walton @ NYJB

Over at the New York Journal of Books, I review Calder Walton’s fascinating Empire of Secrets: British Intelligence, the Cold War, and the Twilight of Empire, all about the UK’s precarious position and its nefarious intelligence practices during the Cold War. Continue reading Empire of Secrets: British Intelligence, the Cold War, and the Twilight of Empire, by Calder Walton @ NYJB

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Tales of Two Cities: Paris, London, and the Birth of the Modern City, by Jonathan Conlin @ NYRB

This week at the New York Journal of Books, I review Tales of Two Cities: Paris, London, and the Birth of the Modern City, by Jonathan Conlin, which is “. . . an entertaining account that strings together fascinating factoids into a tapestry of urban history and cultural anthropology.” Continue reading Tales of Two Cities: Paris, London, and the Birth of the Modern City, by Jonathan Conlin @ NYRB

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The Ada Roundtable: An Open Call for Panelists

I am looking for panelists to participate in a literary roundtable focusing on various aspects of Ada. Everything from family relations to literary history to the postmodernist project can be discussed and explored. For panelists, the prerequisites are comically low. Have you read the book? If you’ve answered yes to that question, then you can be on the panel. Continue reading The Ada Roundtable: An Open Call for Panelists

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