Fidel by Néstor Kohan and Nahuel Sherma

Fidel distills the life of Fidel Castro into less than two hundred pages.  Written by Néstor Kohan and illustrated by Nahuel Sherma, the book functions as a short biography and a primer on such topics as Latin American politics, South American fascism, and anti-globalism.  (The hyperventilating political discourse of today has reduced the term “fascism” to an empty meaningless term.  For an academic investigation, one should consult Stanley Payne’s A History of Fascism: 1914 – 1945.  For a more literary examination, one should read Robert Bolaño’s Borges-esque Nazi Literature in the Americas.)  Kohan writes about Leftist topics and Seven Stories … Continue reading Fidel by Néstor Kohan and Nahuel Sherma

Rate this:

Isabel at Midnight @ Joe Bob Briggs

Isabel at Midnight offers a fascinating mixture of organized crime, white supremacists, and “psycho-kink.”  The novel centers on Isabel Marcano, a scion of a Virginia-based Mafia family.  She suffers from helios-porphyria, meaning she would get serious burns if she exposed her skin to sunlight. Read the rest of the review here. Continue reading Isabel at Midnight @ Joe Bob Briggs

Rate this:

God by Alexander Waugh

The premise of God is simple: write a book about the descriptions of God.  Alexander Waugh, son of columnist Auberon and grandson of satirist Evelyn, crafts a diminutive book exploring the attributes of God.  Mining a variety of sources, including different Bible translations, Gnostic, apocryphal, visionary, Jewish, Muslim and Mormon texts, Waugh offers the reader a multitude of perspectives on the topic.  The challenge comes from the traditionally held beliefs that God is invisible and immaterial.  Waugh leaps from one religious tradition to another, comparing and contrasting, occasionally dissecting a long-held truism with a satirist’s eye. The writing is crisp … Continue reading God by Alexander Waugh

Rate this: