Monthly Archive: April, 2012

An Interview with Ivan Goldman

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The Driftless Area Review interviews Isaac Goldman, author of “Isaac: a modern fable,” to discuss folklore, favorite writers, boxing, and why you shouldn’t try to sell the Tonight Show a joke.

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CCLaP Fridays: Make It Stay, by Joan Frank

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Today’s book review at CCLaP: “Make It Stay” by Joan Frank, which I calls my favorite read so far of the year. The novel explores the lives of two couples in a small Northern California town as they encounter births, deaths, joys, and frustrations. I assert, “Frank’s highly polished literary prose is definitely worth your time.”

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MONDAYS WITH THE SUPREMES, PART III: KOREMATSU, BROWN, AND PADILLA

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A limited-run series where I review three books about the Supreme Court of the United States, exploring its historical and ideological conflicts, and the transformations it wrought upon law and society. This week: Three Supreme Court cases that examine “binding precedent”, race, and national security.

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The Art of Reviewing: Roland Barthes

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After an overlong hiatus, “The Art of Reviewing” returns with a profile of Roland Barthes, exploring his the French semiotician and literary critic expanded the subject matter for reviewers, his influence of pop culture studies, and his usefulness in curatorial practice.

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Translation Tuesdays: Wonder (1962), by Hugo Claus

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Wonder is a strange book. By turns sarcastic, hallucinatory, satirical, and dreamlike, it relates the misadventures of one Victor-Denijs de Rijckel, a teacher who pursues a mysterious woman only to find himself posing as an expert of Crabbe, a messianic figure associated with Nazi collaboration.

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CCLAP Fridays: On Being Human: Warhammer 40K Space Marines

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I continue my essay series “On Being Human”, this week exploring the dark world of Warhammer 40K and the Space Marines.

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Mondays with the Supremes, Part II: Matters of Protocol

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A limited-run series where I review three books about the Supreme Court of the United States, exploring its historical and ideological conflicts, and the transformations it wrought upon law and society. This week: Matters of Protocol

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